Coconut granita

A stockpile of frozen young coconut flesh is a fortunate side effect of my addiction to fresh coconut water. What to do with that stockpile presents me with endless opportunities for foodly experiments.

Yesterday I set out to make coconut sorbet. Because the young coconut flesh did not process as I thought it would or should, I ended up with a refreshing coconut granita instead.

granita

I paired my coconut with pomegranate, a fruit I have loved more since seeing this YouTube clip on how to deseed them [although I have since discovered another clip that I find more respectful and marvellous]. Aside from tasting mouth-poppingly great, pomegranate seeds are incredibly healthful, purportedly acting to inhibit cancer, reduce symptoms and risk factors of heart disease, and generally improve cardiovascular, skeletal and nervous system health.

This recipe is also momentous because it represents my first ever use of yacon syrup. While not a raw product, yacon syrup promises health benefits including (among others) “strengthening the immune system, higher absorption of calcium by the body, reduction of cholesterol level, [and] inhibition of the production of toxins and other carcinogenic substances in the colon” [Manrique, I., Parraga, A. & Hermann, M. (2005) “Yacon Syrup: Principles and Processing”, Centro Internacional de la Papa, Peru]. With a pleasant sweetness that sits somewhere between molasses and malt extract, I can see this prebiotic becoming a regular feature of my foodly experiments.

Recipe #130: Coconut Granita, with pomegranate and yacon syrup. Makes enough for 6-12, depending on serving size. You will need a good blender, food processor or Thermomix (TM) to recreate this recipe.

You will need:
► 520g frozen young coconut flesh, cut into 1-inch squares
► ½ tsp vanilla powder [made from dehydrated and ground vanilla pods, equivalent to the seeds from ½ of a vanilla pod]
► good pinch of salt
► yacon syrup
► seeds from 1 pomegranate

Start by processing the young coconut flesh with the salt and vanilla until a fine ice forms [TM method: 30 seconds on speed 8, then 30 seconds at speed 10, scraping down the sides of the TM every 15 seconds]. Spoon the icy mixture into glasses, layering with pomegranate seeds and at least two drizzles of yacon syrup for a light sweetness.

Find a comfortable seat and indulge immediately using a parfait spoon. Delicious.

Thank you to Angie, for coming along for the ride.

H 🙂

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12 Comments Add yours

  1. the Jilb says:

    This sounds wonderfully refreshing. Thanks for sharing!

    1. Hannah says:

      It is – and kind of lychee-like in flavour. I hope you try it!

      H 🙂

  2. This is really interesting; I’d never heard of yacon syrup – I’ll have to look into it. It sounds delicious in any case. Great photo too by the way 🙂

    1. Hannah says:

      Thanks so much, Healthy Epicurean.

      It took me a long time to discover yacon syrup and I am enjoying its mild sweetness. So good when tasty treats are healthy too!

      H 🙂

      1. Thank you so much for introducing me to it; I ordered some and have just made a rhubarb cake with it (I’m about to post about it). I just love the taste of it (even by the spoonful :-/)

      2. Hannah says:

        I know what you mean! I just ordered myself a megajar of yacon syrup, ready for pick-up on Monday.

        H 🙂

  3. Heather Forrester says:

    Where do you buy young coconuts from in Perth?

    1. Hannah says:

      Thanks for your comment, Heather. I buy my young coconuts from Asian grocers.

      Let me know if you have problems finding them, and I will pass on the names of some suppliers.

      H 🙂

  4. Wow yacon syrup is defiantly new to me! Looks and sounds amazing though!

    1. Hannah says:

      It was new to me too, Katherine! I am appreciating its subtle flavour and sweetness.

      H 🙂

  5. Katherine says:

    That coconut granita looks amazing. 😀

    When I was a kid, what we do with a young coconut is shred the soft meat inside and add it to the coconut water, sometimes adding sugar and condensed milk. It’s sooo refreshing.

    I’m also partial to coconut pies. Seriously, you can do a lot of things with coconuts.

    1. Hannah says:

      I love eating the fresh flesh straight from the coconut too! That’s when it’s at its simple best.

      You are so right about the coconut’s versatility, Katherine. I am constantly finding new uses for the flesh.

      H 🙂

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